Tag Archives: Natural Ingredients

Anise Essential Oil

What are essential oils?
Essential oils are defined as a natural oil typically obtained by distillation and having the characteristic fragrance of the plant. Basically, it’s an oil that is derived from a plant, that still carries the essence of the plant with it, including the fragrance and it’s natural uses for a healthier body. Some essential oils can be used directly on the skin, while others cannot and certain essential oils should be avoided while pregnant. (See our previous blog post on essential oils to avoid while pregnant and breastfeeding.)

Anise Essential Oil Anise
Essential oil is made from the seeds of the Pimpinella anisum plant. For those of you who have already tried this essential oil, you may have noticed that its scent is similar to black licorice. While that may appeal to some of you, those of you who do not like the smell of anise essential oil by itself may find that mixing a few drops with a citrus, or vanilla scent will transform an ordinary scent into a lovely fragrance with subtle undertones. Anise has traditionally been used in everything from Egyptian bread to perfume used by fisherman to mask the human scent. Additionally, anise has been used by many cultures for it’s therapeutic and health properties.

Health Benefits of Anise Essential Oil
Anise essential oil has a number of therapeutic properties. This oil is antiseptic, which is useful for using on small cuts in order to provide a protective layer between the wound and the air. It is also antispasmodic; because it is a relaxant, it helps to relax spasms, it also works as a carminative (helping to relieve gas) by promoting the removal of excess gas. It also works remarkably well as an expectorant helping to loosen excess mucus and phlegm, providing relief from your cough. Anise essential oil is used by massage therapists to stimulate circulation; and used along with massage can help relieve some symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Other Benefits of Anise Essential Oil
Anise can be used as an insecticide as it is toxic to insects and even to some small animals (it is also been known to kill worms in the intestine).

Not all essential oils are safe for everyone. Who should beware of using Anise?
Small children and pets are at risk because this essential oil an be toxic to them, especially in large quantities. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding it is advised that you stay away from this essential oil. If you fit into one of these categories there are many safe essential oils that you can use instead.

What Can I Use Instead?
We recommend trying eucalyptus essential oil instead. it has many of the same characteristics but is safe to use for pregnant women in their 2nd and 3rd trimester.

We’re in the process of developing some safe products for baby care. Stay tuned!

Check out our related articles:
Essential Oils to Avoid While Pregnant & Breastfeeding
How Substances Enter Your Body
How we Accumulate Toxins in our Bodies

Written by Nicolle Chase
SALVE and SalveNaturals.com © 2015 All Rights Reserved

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READ THE LABEL [CHAPTER 5] What does “natural” mean?

Source: newevolutiondesigns.com
Source: newevolutiondesigns.com

As you’ve probably guessed, “natural” means all kinds of things. Everyone seems to have their own definition. Here are a few I found just to put your mind at ease. (Yes, I’m being sarcastic.)

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) [As it applies to meat and poultry only.]

“Those products carrying the “natural” claim must not contain any artificial flavoring, color ingredients, chemical preservatives, or artificial or synthetic ingredients, and are only “minimally processed” defined by USDA as a process that does not fundamentally alter the raw product.”

The USDA further defines synthetic as:
“A substance that is formulated or manufactured by a chemical process or by a process that chemically changes a substance extracted from naturally occurring plant, animal, or mineral sources, except that such term shall not apply to substances created by naturally occurring biological processes.”

Federal Drug Administration (FDA)
Ingredients extracted directly from plants or animal products as opposed to being produced synthetically”

Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients
“Product that is derived from plant, animal or microbial sources, primarily through physical processing, sometimes facilitated by simple chemical reactions such as acidification, basification, ion exchange, hydrolysis, and salt formation as well as microbial fermentation.”

Consumers Union
[Publisher of Consumer Reports, which is an independent, nonprofit testing and information organization serving only consumers]

“Natural is a general claim that implies that the product or packaging is made from or innate to the environment and that nothing artificial or synthetic has been added.”

Other dictionary sources define “natural” as:

    • present in or produced by nature
    • produced using minimal physical processing
    • directly extracted using simple methods, simple chemical reactions or resulting from naturally occurring biological processes?

Natural ingredients are…

  • not produced synthetically
  • free of all petrochemicals
  • not extracted or processed using petrochemicals
  • not extracted or processed using anything other than natural ingredients as solvents
  • not exposed to radiation
  • not genetically engineered & do not contain GMOs (genetically modified organisms)

    Natural ingredients do…
  • not contain synthetic ingredients
  • not contain artificial ingredients including colors or flavoring
  • not contain synthetic chemical preservatives

So who regulates the labeling of “natural” products?
Sadly, there is not a single organization within the United States in 2013 that certifies skin care products as “natural.” It’s simply left to the ethical discretion of the manufacturer. If you’ve met me or sat in one of my presentations, you’ll know that some major brand names are playing mind games with their consumers. Be careful, be educated, and just boycott those products!

Remember, not all synthetic chemicals added to skin care is harmful, and not all products labeled as “natural” are safe.

Stay tuned for more excerpts from my presentation “READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural and Organic Skin Care.”

Written by Dahlia Kelada, from her presentation READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural & Organic Skin Care  © 2013 All Rights Reserved

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READ THE LABEL [CHAPTER 4] Is your shower killing you?

Source: www.unionhardwaredc.com
Source: unionhardwaredc.com

Okay, don’t freak out. But at the same time, this is important wisdom that you will never forget after reading this post. Please share this information with your family and friends.

First, we’ll talk about the four things to consider about chemical absorption, and then we’ll talk about your daily shower.

Chemical Absorption

1 – Method of consumption: If you read [PART 2] of my READ THE LABEL series, you’ll know there are four methods of consumption. Meaning, things enter your body through 1) digestion; 2) inhalation; 3) injection; and 4) through the skin. How you are exposing yourself to a product may increase the chance of absorption. In other words, drinking hair gel will have a different toxic affect and absorption in your body compared to using it in your hair.

2 – Concentration: How much of that product we are putting, and at what concentration. Is that chemical being diluted, or is it being applied/inhaled/digested/injected at 100% concentration?

3 – Time: This is so important, how long you allow a chemical to stay on or in your body increases the toxic absorption. The example I give here is using bleach cleaner. If you mop your floor with bleach, you should be diluting it per the instructions on the container. So what if you accidentally splash your leg while mopping the floor? Well you should immediately go wash your legs. If you wait to wash your leg till after you’re done mopping the kitchen, the longer time that chemical has had to absorb through your skin, breaking the sebum layer, and entering into the blood stream.

Now, think about the same scenario happening if the bleach wasn’t diluted. What if it got into your eyes? Have you stopped to consider the vapor from bleach, and that you’re inhaling it the entire time/and post cleaning?

What if you’re not using a chemical as strong as bleach? What if it’s your favorite lemony scented wood cleaner or window cleaner … often times, we over look the fact that many of these products have a “fragrance” or “scent” (which by the way is almost always petroleum based) that creates fumes that we inhale and that irritate our eyes.

4 – Frequency: How often you are exposing your body to those chemicals. Is it daily, hourly, monthly?

The combination of these four factors will determine how much absorption you’ll experience with the chemicals to which you are exposed. By the way, it’s worth mentioning that this method of evaluation is used in Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Federal Drug Administration (FDA) regulations and assessments of chemicals and their safe use, even in industrial applications.

Your Daily Shower
Hopefully everyone is staying clean, but let’s be clean without putting our health in danger. In an average shower we use shampoo, conditioner, shower gel, shaving gel, etc. Think about how many ingredients are used to make up each of those products. Stop reading this and go read your labels. Meet me back here when you’re done!

Okay, so each product probably has 10+ ingredients, many of them you know, most you have no clue, right? In my upcoming posts, I’ll talk about some of these ingredients individually. But for now, the point you need to know is, if you’re exposing yourself to these products daily (frequency) for 15 minutes (time) and applied on body/hair (method of consumption) but don’t forget, the hot water creates a vapor for these chemicals (method of consumption). That’s 5475 minutes a year you are spending putting chemicals on your body. AND THAT’S JUST THE SHOWER! And how many chemicals did you count again??

This is your intervention. Take steps to eliminate exposure to these chemicals by stopping them cold turkey. It’s like going on a permanent product diet. Be smart, this is your family we’re talking about.

Stay tuned for more excerpts from my presentation “READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural and Organic Skin Care.”

Written by Dahlia Kelada, from her presentation READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural & Organic Skin Care  © 2013 All Rights Reserved

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READ THE LABEL [CHAPTER 2] How Substances Enter Your Body

So the only way to get toxins in your body is if you present the opportunity for it to happen. Sometimes it’s controlled behavior, and others not.

There are four ways substances can enter your body:

1)   Ingestion, which basically means eating or putting something in your mouth. It doesn’t have to be swallowed for it to be considered ingested necessarily. The salivary glands produced in your mouth have enzymes that start to break down the food while it’s in your mouth. Meanwhile, signals get sent to your brain that food is coming, which tells your stomach to prepare. There are many blood vessels in the mouth, especially under the tongue that almost immediately start the absorption process, sending minerals and vitamins, and whatever else is in the food that can be easily absorbed, into the blood stream. That’s why you may have seen sublingual vitamin drops or tablets. “Sublingual” means “under the tongue.” Medicine often begins absorption before it’s even swallowed.

Source: www.howstuffworks.com
Source: www.howstuffworks.com

2)   Inhalation is another way substances enter the body. Not just through the nose, but also the mouth. The tiny hairs in our noses help filter debris and foreign microorganisms from entering our body. The mouth, on other the other hand, has no filter. Often times, we can control what we put in our mouths; but what we breathe through the mouth cannot always be controlled. For example, stinky cheap perfume from your office coworker. (If you follow my articles, you should know that perfume is made of 95% petrochemicals that is toxic to our bodies even if we breathe it.) You also can’t control the people smoking outside your office building, again toxins that enter the body.

3)   Injection is often overlooked as a method of getting toxins into the body. This isn’t only through needles from medicine or vitamin injections, but this is also from bites (animals, kids), cuts and scratches. For example, I love animals and often take Biscuit to the dog park. I know my dog is clean because I’m one of the good pet owners, but you don’t always know the other dogs at the park. One day I got bit by one beastly Kujo, and went and got a tetanus shot.  Why is the shot necessary? Well, one, any disease that dog may have that shot will help protect me from contracting anything, but also because there are hundreds of bacterial organisms in the mouths of animals (AND PEOPLE) that are on the very tip of teeth, and a bite injects that bacteria below the skin. Injection can also come from bites from nasty kids or from insects.

4)   Skin absorption is the more commonly recognized way of substances entering the body. While not all chemicals or ingredients get absorbed, many do and those that are not removed through normal digestion and elimination, can build up over time in the body causing toxic reactions to our immune, adrenal and reproductive systems.

Stay tuned for more excerpts from my presentation “READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural and Organic Skin Care.”

Written by Dahlia Kelada, from her presentation READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural & Organic Skin Care  © 2013 All Rights Reserved

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